Looking for Barn Swallow nesting reports


Bird Studies Canada has begun tracking nesting records of Barn Swallows, as their number are declining rapidly.  I am enclosing an email I received from Bird Studies Canada.  If you can help with their study it will be much appreciated.

Have you ever seen a Barn Swallow mud nest cup attached to a house, shed, or barn?  Then please consider reporting it to the new Barn Swallow NestWatch project! Birds Studies Canada needs your nest information to help us understand this special and entertaining bird!   It only takes a few minutes to fill in our online form (http://goo.gl/4X9wb) and provide simple yet critical information on the nesting structure type and surrounding habitat. 

If you have Barn Swallows nesting near you and would like to monitor the progress of the nest, please visit the Barn Swallow NestWatch website (http://www.birdscanada.org/volunteer/pnw) for more information. 

Although Barn Swallows are still fairly common, their numbers are decreasing rapidly across Canada; however, the reasons for the decline are not well understood. 

To learn more about the program contact Kristyn Richardson at krichardson@birdscanada.org<mailto:krichardson@birdscanada.org> or 519-586-3531 ext 127. 

Kristyn Richardson, Stewardship Biologist Bird Studies Canada P.O. Box 160, 115 Front Street Port Rowan, Ontario  N0E1M0

Phone:  (519) 586-3531 ext. 127

Toll Free: (888) 448-2473 ext. 127

www.birdscanada.org<http://www.birdscanada.org>

(posted by Kathy Jones volunteer@birdscanada.org<mailto:volunteer@birdscanada.org> with permission of the ontbirds coordinator).

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One response to this post.

  1. Posted by Lynn Sanders on May 31, 2013 at 1:24 pm

    Thanks Dave. I’ll try to follow up. We have perhaps 10 pair nesting in our barn right now. My own speculation would be that it is primarily an issue of loss of habitat. People take down nests because of sanitation issues – above the car or a deck – people value their things more than the lives of these wonderfully cheery, chatty birds.

    Reply

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